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Missing

Angela M. Dufrene










Missing Person Case September 2021



Missing Person Case September 2021



Missing Person Case September 2021


Angela, approximately 2014; Age when reported missing: 7 (approximately 2021); Marjorie Dufrene




Date reported missing : 12/01/2014

Missing location (approx) :
Miami, Florida
Missing classification : Endangered Missing
Gender : Female
Ethnicity :
Black


DOB : 04/25/2014 (7)
Age at the time of disappearance: 7 months old
Height / Weight : 2'0, 30 pounds
Distinguishing characteristics, birthmarks, tattoos : African-American female. Black hair, brown eyes.





Information on the case from local sources, may or may not be correct : Angela lived with her twin brother and her two-year-old sister, their mother, Marjorie Dufrene, and Marjorie's boyfriend in Miami, Florida. Marjorie's two oldest children, Age at the time of disappearance: d four and ten, lived with their father, Marjorie's estranged husband Lewis Dufrene, but visited their mother on weekends. Although Lewis is the twins' legal father because he was married to their mother when they were born, he may not be their biological father; Marjorie claims the twins' father is a former boyfriend named Henry Mathieu.
A photo of Marjorie is posted with this case summary. The Florida Department of Children and Families (DCF) was supposed to be monitoring the family; Marjorie had a long history with them, dating back to 2011, when she hit her son in the face with a belt so badly he needed surgery to his eye.
In around October or November 2014, Marjorie stopped bringing Angela to daycare and would only bring her twin brother; she said Angela was with her grandmother. Lewis had visits with the twins and their older sibling at a DCF office through late 2014, but starting in 2015, Marjorie would only bring Angela's twin to the social services office for visitation, not Angela herself.
The last verified sighting of Angela was in December 2014, when a doctor saw her while administering vaccinations. During this time period DCF workers repeatedly met with Marjorie and her family and investigated reports of physical abuse regarding the twins' older siblings, but they never actually saw Angela. In July 2015, a sheriff's investigator found "no safety concerns for the children" in the home.
Angela's disappearance was not reported until July 2016. That summer there were reports that one of Angela's sisters had been Gender : ually abused by Marjorie's boyfriend, that the apartment was filthy and had no food, and that Marjorie's older children were forced to sit outside in the hallway as a punishment when they visited on weekends. While investigating, a DCF worker spoke to the family's landlord. The landlord said he had no knowledge of Angela's existence and that as far as he knew, Marjorie had four children, not five.
When the investigator spoke to Marjorie, Marjorie said she had only four children. When confronted with Angela's birth certificate, however, she changed her story and said Angela was with her birth father, a man she identified as Henry Mathieu. However, she gave the investigator an incorrect phone number for Mathieu, and pretended to call him as she and the investigator drove around the North Miami-Dade area looking for Mathieu's address.
When Marjorie and the investigator returned to the DCF office, Marjorie changed her story and said Angela was with Mathieu's mother. Mathieu's mother, when asked about this, said this story was a lie. Marjorie's sister and live-in boyfriend both stated they had never met Angela, and Angela's eleven-year-old brother told investigators that his baby sister had been Date reported missing : at least the summer of 2015 and he had stopped asking about her.
Then Marjorie claimed that in March 2016, she had dropped Angela during an argument with her boyfriend and that she had died and her boyfriend had disposed of the body, something the boyfriend denied. Marjorie then told yet another story: she said the baby had been unable to stop crying, then "fell" out of her mother's arms. Marjorie then put Angela in a car seat, and the baby started coughing up blood and died, so her mother wrapped her body in a black garbAge at the time of disappearance: bag and put it in a McDonald's restaurant dumpster.
Later in July 2016, during a court appearance, the judge asked Marjorie where Angela was. Marjorie's attorney was present and attempted to invoke her right against self-incrimination, but Marjorie stated, "She is dead. She is no longer with us."
Investigators believe Angela is dead, but no one has been charged in her presumed death due to lack of evidence, including lack of a body and lack of witnesses to any crime. Her case remains unsolved.


Other information and links : ncy

Miami Police Department
305-603-6640



September 2021 updates and sources

A missing person is a person who has disappeared and whose status as alive or dead cannot be confirmed as their location and condition are not known. A person may go missing through a voluntary disappearance, or else due to an accident, crime, death in a location where they cannot be found (such as at sea), or many other reasons. In most parts of the world, a missing person will usually be found quickly. While criminal abductions are some of the most widely reported missing person cases, these account for only 2–5% of missing children in Europe. By contrast, some missing person cases remain unresolved for many years. Laws related to these cases are often complex since, in many jurisdictions, relatives and third parties may not deal with a person's assets until their death is considered proven by law and a formal death certificate issued. The situation, uncertainties, and lack of closure or a funeral resulting when a person goes missing may be extremely painful with long-lasting effects on family and friends. Several organizations seek to connect, share best practices, and disseminate information and imAge at the time of disappearance: s of missing children to improve the effectiveness of missing children investigations, including the International Commission on Missing Persons, the International Centre for Missing & Exploited Children (ICMEC), as well as national organizations, including the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children in the US, Missing People in the UK, Child Focus in Belgium, and The Smile of the Child in Greece.
Florida Department of Law Enforcement
The Miami Herald
Florida's Children First
Missing Children’s Statistics One Missing Child Is One Too Many The lack of a common definition of “missing child,” and a common response to the issue, results in few reliable statistics on the scope of the problem around the world. Even with this challenge, we know that: In Australia, an estimated 20,000 children are reported missing every year. Australian Federal Police, National Coordination Centre. In Canada, an estimated 45,288 children are reported missing each year. Government of Canada, Canada’s Missing – 2015 Fast Fact Sheet. In Germany, an estimated 100,000 children are reported missing each year. Initiative Vermisste Kinder. In India, an estimated 96,000 children go missing each year. Bachpan Bachao Andolan, Missing Children of India. In Jamaica, an estimated 1,984 children were reporting missing in 2015. Jamaica’s Office of Children’s Registry In Russia, an estimated 45,000 children were reported missing in 2015. Interview with Pavel Astakhov MIA “Russia Today”, Apr. 4, 2016. In Spain, an estimated 20,000 children are reported missing every year. Spain Joins EU Hotline for Missing Children, Sep. 22, 2010. In the United Kingdom, an estimated 112,853 children are reported missing every year. National Crime Agency, UK Missing Persons Bureau. In the United States, an estimated 460,000 children are reported missing every year. Federal Bureau of Investigation, Missing Children’s Statistics One Missing Child Is One Too Many The lack of a common definition of “missing child,” and a common response to the issue, results in few reliable statistics on the scope of the problem around the world. Even with this challenge, we know that: In Australia, an estimated 20,000 children are reported missing every year. Australian Federal Police, National Coordination Centre. In Canada, an estimated 45,288 children are reported missing each year. Government of Canada, Canada’s Missing – 2015 Fast Fact Sheet. In Germany, an estimated 100,000 children are reported missing each year. Initiative Vermisste Kinder. In India, an estimated 96,000 children go missing each year. Bachpan Bachao Andolan, Missing Children of India. In Jamaica, an estimated 1,984 children were reporting missing in 2015. Jamaica’s Office of Children’s Registry In Russia, an estimated 45,000 children were reported missing in 2015. Interview with Pavel Astakhov MIA “Russia Today”, Apr. 4, 2016. In Spain, an estimated 20,000 children are reported missing every year. Spain Joins EU Hotline for Missing Children, Sep. 22, 2010. In the United Kingdom, an estimated 112,853 children are reported missing every year. National Crime Agency, UK Missing Persons Bureau. In the United States, an estimated 460,000 children are reported missing every year. Federal Bureau of Investigation, NCIC. This, however, is only a snapshot of the problem. In many countries, statistics on missing children are not even available; and, unfortunately, even available statistics may be inaccurate due to: under-reporting/under-recognition; inflation; incorrect database entry of case information; and deletion of records once a case is closed. The lack of numbers, and the discrepancy in the numbers that do exist, is one of the key reasons why ICMEC developed and advocates for the Model Missing Child Framework, which assists countries with building strong, well-rounded national responses, and facilitates more efficient investigations, management, and resolution of missing children cases. We firmly believe that one missing child is one too many, and we are committed to improving the global understanding of and response to missing and abducted children. Here is a look at missing children in the United States. There are several different types of missing children: runaways, family abductions, lost or “thrown away” and non-family abductions. Advances in technology, communications through public alerts and greater cooperation from law enforcement have facilitated the recovery process. Statistics According to the FBI’s National Crime Information Center (NCIC) Missing Person File, there are 89,637 active missing person records, of which juveniles under the age of 18 account for 30,396 (34%) of the records. (as of December 31, 2020) AMBER Alert “AMBER (America’s Missing: Broadcast Emergency Response) Alerts are emergency messages broadcast when a law enforcement agency determines that a child has been abducted and is in imminent danger. The broadcasts include information about the child and the abductor, including physical descriptions as well as information about the abductor’s vehicle - which could lead to the child’s recovery.” The AMBER Alert system began in 1996 and was named in honor of Amber Hagerman, a 9-year-old who was abducted in Arlington, Texas, and murdered. All 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the US Virgin Islands have AMBER Alert plans in place to help find missing children in danger. As of December 2020, the AMBER Alert program has been credited with the safe recovery of 1029 children.. This, however, is only a snapshot of the problem. In many countries, statistics on missing children are not even available; and, unfortunately, even available statistics may be inaccurate due to: under-reporting/under-recognition; inflation; incorrect database entry of case information; and deletion of records once a case is closed. The lack of numbers, and the discrepancy in the numbers that do exist, is one of the key reasons why ICMEC developed and advocates for the Model Missing Child Framework, which assists countries with building strong, well-rounded national responses, and facilitates more efficient investigations, management, and resolution of missing children cases. We firmly believe that one missing child is one too many, and we are committed to improving the global understanding of and response to missing and abducted children. Here is a look at missing children in the United States. There are several different types of missing children: runaways, family abductions, lost or “thrown away” and non-family abductions. Advances in technology, communications through public alerts and greater cooperation from law enforcement have facilitated the recovery process. Statistics According to the FBI’s National Crime Information Center (Missing Children’s Statistics One Missing Child Is One Too Many The lack of a common definition of “missing child,” and a common response to the issue, results in few reliable statistics on the scope of the problem around the world. Even with this challenge, we know that: In Australia, an estimated 20,000 children are reported missing every year. Australian Federal Police, National Coordination Centre. In Canada, an estimated 45,288 children are reported missing each year. Government of Canada, Canada’s Missing – 2015 Fast Fact Sheet. In Germany, an estimated 100,000 children are reported missing each year. Initiative Vermisste Kinder. In India, an estimated 96,000 children go missing each year. Bachpan Bachao Andolan, Missing Children of India. In Jamaica, an estimated 1,984 children were reporting missing in 2015. Jamaica’s Office of Children’s Registry In Russia, an estimated 45,000 children were reported missing in 2015. Interview with Pavel Astakhov MIA “Russia Today”, Apr. 4, 2016. In Spain, an estimated 20,000 children are reported missing every year. Spain Joins EU Hotline for Missing Children, Sep. 22, 2010. In the United Kingdom, an estimated 112,853 children are reported missing every year. National Crime Agency, UK Missing Persons Bureau. In the United States, an estimated 460,000 children are reported missing every year. Federal Bureau of Investigation, NCIC. This, however, is only a snapshot of the problem. In many countries, statistics on missing children are not even available; and, unfortunately, even available statistics may be inaccurate due to: under-reporting/under-recognition; inflation; incorrect database entry of case information; and deletion of records once a case is closed. The lack of numbers, and the discrepancy in the numbers that do exist, is one of the key reasons why ICMEC developed and advocates for the Model Missing Child Framework, which assists countries with building strong, well-rounded national responses, and facilitates more efficient investigations, management, and resolution of missing children cases. We firmly believe that one missing child is one too many, and we are committed to improving the global understanding of and response to missing and abducted children. Here is a look at missing children in the United States. There are several different types of missing children: runaways, family abductions, lost or “thrown away” and non-family abductions. Advances in technology, communications through public alerts and greater cooperation from law enforcement have facilitated the recovery process. Statistics According to the FBI’s National Crime Information Center (NCIC) Missing Person File, there are 89,637 active missing person records, of which juveniles under the age of 18 account for 30,396 (34%) of the records. (as of December 31, 2020) AMBER Alert “AMBER (America’s Missing: Broadcast Emergency Response) Alerts are emergency messages broadcast when a law enforcement agency determines that a child has been abducted and is in imminent danger. The broadcasts include information about the child and the abductor, including physical descriptions as well as information about the abductor’s vehicle - which could lead to the child’s recovery.” The AMBER Alert system began in 1996 and was named in honor of Amber Hagerman, a 9-year-old who was abducted in Arlington, Texas, and murdered. All 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the US Virgin Islands have AMBER Alert plans in place to help find missing children in danger. As of December 2020, the AMBER Alert program has been credited with the safe recovery of 1029 children.) Missing Person File, there are 89,637 active missing person records, of which juveniles under the age of 18 account for 30,396 (34%) of the records. (as of December 31, 2020) AMBER Alert “AMBER (America’s Missing: Broadcast Emergency Response) Alerts are emergency messages broadcast when a law enforcement agency determines that a child has been abducted and is in imminent danger. The broadcasts include information about the child and the abductor, including physical descriptions as well as information about the abductor’s vehicle - which could lead to the child’s recovery.” The AMBER Alert system began in 1996 and was named in honor of Amber Hagerman, a 9-year-old who was abducted in Arlington, Texas, and murdered. All 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the US Virgin Islands have AMBER Alert plans in place to help find missing children in danger. As of December 2020, the AMBER Alert program has been credited with the safe recovery of 1029 children.














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